Fairs

Art Dubai grows wise in a maturing market

Bold installations sell to ideas-driven regional collectors

Published online: 24 March 2015

Recently published

At Tefaf Maastricht, art dealers mix old and new more than ever

Contemporary works fresh from the studio hang alongside Renaissance masterpieces

Published online: 16 March 2015

Why China’s artists love (and hate) WeChat

WeChat, Weibo and Douban too, pros and cons of China’s popular social media platforms

Published online: 15 March 2015

Big-brand fair that's not just about biennial favourites

For many Western collectors Art Basel in Hong Kong provides a chance to discover young Asian artists

Published online: 13 March 2015

China now the biggest market for Modern art

China surpasses US on Modern art spend

Published online: 13 March 2015

Shanghai next stop for 15 Rooms

Long Museum to host fifth iteration of performance art show

Published online: 13 March 2015

 

Going global is "bonkers", says Grayson

The Comfort Blanket tapestry by the artist Grayson Perry, Britain’s best known transvestite ceramicist, is emblazoned with...

Where the parties are: tonight in Hong Kong

While most public events during Art Basel in Hong Kong kick off on Saturday (14 March), for those on the invitation lists, brunches and...

The Other Art Fair turns to Turk

A new art fair on the horizon will no doubt prompt groans and grumbles from aficionados suffering from "fairtigue". But the Other Art fair...

 

The Portuguese return to Macau

As Art Basel in Hong Kong rolls on, the Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos is preparing for a solo show in China’s other special administrative region, Macau, her first in the region. At the MGM casino resort, Vasconcelos is creating 1,200 kilo piece titled Valkyrie Octopus. The work measures 35 by 20 metres and is made of more than 4,000 metres of coloured fabrics, thousands of beads, 3,100 metres of electric cable, and has LED lights placed throughout. The site-specific work deals with the Portuguese presence in Macau, which began in the 16th century and ended, officially, in 1999.