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Three to see: Vienna

From dog bites at Viennacontemporary to Pop portraits at the Albertina

by Gareth Harris  |  23 September 2016
Three to see: Vienna
Artelier Contemporary at Viennacontemporary (Image: © viennacontemporary / A. Murashkin)
The second edition of the Viennacontemporary fair at the Marx Halle (until 25 September) continues to focus on Eastern European and younger art. The Serbian artists’ collective Sok Zadruga presents a series of drawings by Slobodan Stosic, Of Dogs and Dogs (2016), priced at €400 each, which show individuals biting themselves (the artist explains that the works were inspired by press reports about people claiming insurance for fictitious dog bites). Local gallery Elisabeth & Klaus Thoman is, meanwhile, selling two limited edition blankets called Plaid (dots) by John Armleder. Fans of the veteran Swiss artist can bag a blanket for €660 (edition of 100 for each) ahead of an exhibition dedicated to Armleder at the Vienna gallery (5 November-22 December).

The organisers of a 60-strong survey of self-portraits (5 November) by the US artist Jim Dine at the Albertina Museum (I Never Look Away, until 2 October) say that “the preoccupation with his own portrait runs like a thread through the artist’s comprehensive and highly versatile oeuvre”. The journey through Dine’s life is plotted in the exhibition via unabashed images such as the nude Self-portrait in Vermont (Spring, 1979) and a triptych showing Dine at 80 in Paris (2015-16).

The Leopold Museum continues to make the best of its major asset: 42 paintings and 187 works on paper by the local artist, and early 20th-century superstar, Egon Schiele. A new presentation of the collection, entitled Self-abandonment and Self-assertion, juxtaposes insightful biographical information with graphic self-portraits such as Seated Male Nude (1910) and landscapes including Setting Sun (1913). A lengthy wall caption describes the controversy over the 1912 Portrait of Wally, which was the subject of a 13-year restitution battle.  

Three more to see in Vienna: From Alexandria to Abu Simbel, Egypt in Early Photographs 1849-75 at Kunsthistorisches Museum (until 25 September); Nathalie Du Pasquier: Big Objects Not Always Silent at Kunsthalle Wien (until 13 November); Yto Barrada, The Sample Book at The Secession (until 1 November).

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